Kafka novel

May 12, 2016
What struck me about the novel

The fantastic Japanese manager Yukio Ninagawa, now 79, gave us some unforgettable productions over the years. But even by their criteria, this form of Haruki Murakami’s 2002 novel is very some thing. A complex narrative is rendered through numerous moments ready in huge plastic cubes that glide about the phase like phantasmagoric art installations, with a heroic military of scene-shifters.

Devoid of read Murakami’s novel, we can’t discuss the fidelity of Frank Galati’s adaptation. That which we see are a couple of synchronous, finally interrelated tales. In one, a 15-year-old guy phoning himself Kafka, after his literary hero, operates overseas in a quest discover their mama and sis. Into the various other, an old man called Nakata, apparently endowed with mystical powers after a mysterious youth accident, pursues his objective to track lost cats. In another of the absolute most telling juxtapositions regarding the two stories, the studious Kafka dwells from the Nazi Adolf Eichmann’s mechanistic method of mass murder, while Nakata shows instinctive person compunction on the need to get rid of a cat-killer.

Even in the event the narrative is top-heavy with motifs and some ideas, such as the circularity period plus the moving nature of identity, the staging is riveting. Ninagawa along with his fashion designer conjure up a world poised between truth and fantasy, which embraces from crazy woodlands to neon-lit urban hells, and presents figures ranging from speaking kitties to Hegel-quoting sex-workers. Nino Furuhata as Kafka, Rie Miyazawa while the mama he Oedipally desires and Katsumi Kiba because the cat-seeking holy fool are all impressive, however it is the black-clad stagehands which deserve the loudest applause for making Ninagawa’s sight feasible. The play quotes Yeats’s epigram that “in desires start responsibility”. An individual might include that goals can also result in a sensuous theatrical spectacle.

Source: www.theguardian.com
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